When the Going Gets Tough, the Tough Press Pause

You can’t protect your child from feeling stressed out, angry or sad. What you can do is teach him ways of managing his stress. Learn more from The Learning Child blog ….

The Learning Child Blog

shutterstock_216207325

The parts of our brain that are involved in reacting to emotions can quickly hijack our ability to reason and control our intentional spotlight. Think of all the times you regret saying something because you were wound-up or overly emotional. If only you’d pressed pause to think about your reactions before blurting out your feelings. Kids need this pause space too, although it is difficult for them to recognize when they need it. Often, when our child is upset or emotional, we feel the immediate need to do something about it – to argue back, to cuddle her, to yell, or to put our face right up close to hers so that she will concentrate on what we have to say.

However, the best strategy is to press pause and wait for your child to calm down. By doing this, you give your child the opportunity to practice calming herself…

View original post 481 more words

Superhero Exploration

Do you remember playing superheroes as a child? I do! I remember my own children making capes and coming up with stories as they “saved their friends and siblings”. I went to the link in this blog and read how Sarah Erdman and Meredith Downing used superheroes to teach life lessons.

“During that sidekick day, we teachers made two new observations about the superhero play. First, the children did not cling to the superheroes they knew from popular culture. Sure, there were plenty of Batmans and Batgirls (and even a Superman who wore a Spider-Man costume); but we also had Super Pig, who carried a Pig Wand that made witches disappear, and Super Dog, who wore a superhero robot costume.” From “Science of Superheros” by Sarah Erdman and Meredith Downing

Here’s to all the parents, grandparents, teachers and caregivers who make our children feel like they are superheroes too!

Have a great day & be superhero cool!

Soni Cochran

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere – http://lancaster.unl.edu

The Learning Child Blog

CZHWdgtUgAAFkwgMany parents may overlook superheroes teaching their children about life lessons. However, Sarah Erdman and Meredith Downing, prove otherwise with one of their articles. Children can learn a lot from superheroes; it all depends on how you direct the teachings.

One of the first thing that you can incorporate with superheroes is creativity. Children should be encouraged to think on what they would want to be as a superhero, including their powers and their backstory. It improves your child’s creative thinking and helps them learn how to explore options.

Along with developing exploration and creative thinking, it makes children think more in-depth on more than just the how the superheroes save the day, but why do they do what they do? Superheroes do not always get the recognition for their work in helping others, but they continue to do it—and enjoy it. Opening children’s minds to this way of thinking…

View original post 66 more words

Just in Time!

Nebraska Extension has terrific resources for families and teachers. Many of these are free! Please share with family, friends and colleagues:

Just in Time Parenting: Are you expecting your first child? Do you have children or grandchildren? Maybe a teen who is babysitting?

Just in Time Parenting newsletters are free – available on-line or sent to your email. Covers 1st trimester to age 5. From our eXtension university partners: View newsletters on-line or subscribe HERE


Texts4Teachers! Nebraska Extension’s Texts4Teachers delivers text messages for teachers of children from birth through age 8 that focus on the critical areas of: Child development | Family involvement | Social and emotional development | Health, safety and nutrition | Curriculum and activities CLICK HERE for more details

GrandsonGrandpa

Visit Families: Nebraska’s Future for more resources. Remember, if you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Chilly Banana Pops – Summertime Snack!

MomKidsx680From Nebraska Extension: Make a cool and refreshing snack this summer with bananas and your favorite toppings. These pops are a great way to use extra bananas and get children helping in the kitchen. print-friendly version:

Ingredients (makes 12 servings):

  • 3 large bananas
  • 1 carton low-fat Greek or regular-flavored yogurt
  • 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips, melted
  • Popsicle sticks
  • Garnishes (optional):
    • dry cereal or granola
    • crushed graham crackers
    • toasted shredded coconut
    • chopped nuts
    • colored sprinkles
    • chopped dried or fresh fruit

Directions:

Peel and cut each banana into four chunks. Insert a popsicle stick into each banana chunk. Place on a cookie sheet lined with wax or parchment paper and freeze for about 30 to 60 minutes.

Remove the bananas from the freezer and dip, one banana at a time, into either the yogurt or melted chocolate, making sure the banana is completely covered. Roll or sprinkle the coated banana in a garnish, if desired. The finished bananas can be eaten immediately or placed back on the baking sheet and frozen.

Once completely frozen, the bananas can be stored in a covered container, for about one week.

Author: Carol Schwarz, MS, RD, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Buffalo County.

For more information on cooking with children, visit Food Fun for Young Children at: http://food.unl.edu/web/fnh/food-fun-for-young-children

Is My Child Ready to Stay Home Alone?

When are your children ready to stay home aloneAs parents, we’re legally responsible for our children’s welfare until they reach adulthood. Under some circumstances, a parent can be charged with neglect for leaving children unattended or left with under-aged children, including siblings. Check your state law!

Unfortunately, there’s no magical age when our kids develop the maturity and good sense needed to stay alone. However, there are some signs that can help you decide if your child is ready or not.

  • …indicates a willingness to stay home alone.
  • …shows signs he or she can be responsible.
  • …is aware of the needs of others.
  • …is able to get ready for school on time.
  • …can solve problems on his or her own.
  • …completes homework and household chores with minimal supervision.
  • …remembers to tell you where they are going and tells you when they arrive home.

Continue reading

The July Issue of the NEBLINE is on-line!

The NEBLINE Newsletter

Check it out! The July issue of The NEBLINE newsletter is now on-line. Read it free! Here are some of the articles featured in this issue – – – – Visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/nebline and click on the link to the July 2015 NEBLINE!

  • Reduce Bullying and Cyberbullying Through Social and Emotional Learning
  • Fireworks Safety
  • Laundry Stain Removal
  • The Weather Challenges for Haying
  • Protecting Trees from Borer Damage
  • There is Still Time to Control Bagworms in Early July
  • Cleaning Up After Raccoons is Serious Business
  • Avoiding Chiggers
  • 4-H News, Resources
  • …. and much more

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Damp Basement? Using a dehumidifier

Many basements are damp after all the moisture we have had the last few weeks. Reducing the moisture level in the damp areas is very important. Depending on where you live, summers bring high humidity and extra rain does not help for those trying to keep living areas dry. One method to use is a dehumidifier.

It is recommended to keep the humidity level between 30 and 50 percent in the summer and 30 to 40 percent in the winter.

There are two forms of humidity: absolute humidity and relative humidity. Absolute humidity refers to the mass of water vapor divided by the mass of dry air in a volume of air at a given temperature. As such, the hotter the air, the more water it contains.

Some facts to consider when purchasing a dehumidifier: Continue reading