Festive, tasty and kid-friendly green smoothie – Recipe of the Month

This recipe accompanied an article by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County. It appears in the March 2019 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter


Clover Power Smoothie

(Photo by Kayla Colgrove, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County)

For St. Patrick’s Day, I rename this recipe “Shamrocks & Gold Smoothie” to celebrate with a festive, tasty and kid-friendly green smoothie.

CLOVER POWER SMOOTHIE
(Makes 4 Cups)

2/3 cup 100% apple juice*
1/2 cup fresh baby spinach**
2 cups frozen pineapple chunks, no sugar added
1 cup low-fat vanilla yogurt***
1 banana

1. Add apple juice and spinach leaves to blender. Blend first to help make it smooth and avoid leafy chunks.
2. Place the remaining ingredients in the blender.
3. Blend until smooth and serve.

Kayla’s notes:
*You can substitute low-fat or nonfat milk or 100% white grape juice for 100% apple juice. Adding milk instead of 100% fruit juice will lower the calories and sugar while adding extra calcium to help strengthen bones.

**You can use kale instead of spinach. Kale does have a stronger flavor than spinach. I really like using spinach since it has little to no flavor.

***To make the smoothie even healthier, use nonfat vanilla yogurt or nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt instead of low-fat vanilla yogurt.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving (1 cup): 135 Calories, 1g Total Fat, 0g Saturated Fat, 35mg Sodium, 31g Total Carbs, 24g Sugars, 2g Dietary Fiber, 2g Protein

Read “Eat more dark-green veggies for St. Patrick’s Day and beyond” in the March 2019 Nebline Newsletter. Available free on-line!

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

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Chicken Noodle Soup – Recipe of the Month

This recipe accompanied an article by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County. It appears in the January 2019 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter


Chicken Noodle Soup

(Photo by Craig Chandler, UNL Communications)

January is national soup month. Try this recipe from Nebraska Extension’s Nutrition Education Program (nep.unl.edu) which includes whole wheat egg noodles. It is easily adaptable to beef noodle or chicken and rice soup.

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP
(6 Servings)

1 whole chicken*
1 teaspoon salt
Water, to cover
1 onion, chopped
3 large carrots, sliced
1 cup celery, sliced
3/4 cup whole wheat egg noodles, uncooked**

  1. In a large saucepan, place chicken and salt. Add enough water so the chicken is covered. Heat to boiling. Cover, reduce heat and simmer about 45 minutes or until chicken is tender.
  2. Remove chicken from broth and cool enough to handle. Remove skin and bones and chop the meat. Skim fat from broth.
  3. Add additional water, if needed, to make 6 cups. Bring to a boil.
  4. Add chicken, onion, carrots, celery and noodles to the broth. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.

*Substitute 2 pounds roast or stew meat for chicken to make Beef Noodle Soup.
**Substitute 3/4 cup rice for noodles to make Chicken and Rice Soup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 180, Total Fat 3.5 g (5% DV), 1 g Saturated Fat (5% DV), 80 mg Cholesterol (27% DV), 520 mg Sodium (22% DV), 11 g Total Carbohydrate (4% DV), 2 g Dietary Fiber (8% DV), 3 g Sugars, 25 g Protein, Vitamin A 100%, Vitamin C 15 %, Calcium 4%, Iron 8%.

Source: Nebraska Nutrition Education Program

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Roasting chestnuts … and what has happened to American Chestnut trees?

American Chestnuts. Photo by Pixabay

American Chestnuts. Photo by Pixabay

So how do you roast chestnuts?

With a sharp knife, make an incision through the smooth outer skin and textured inner skin on the rounded side of each nut. This allows steam to escape and prevents the nuts from bursting during roasting. Roast the nuts over an open fire in a wire popcorn basket or special chestnut roasting pan, shaking periodically, for 15-20 minutes. Allow the nuts to cool slightly before peeling and eating. Chestnuts can also be roasted in the oven after scoring, at 375 ° degrees for 15-25 minutes. Place them in a shallow pan, and turn them over mid-way through the roasting time.

The information on roasting chestnuts was included in the following article written by Sarah Browning, Extension Educator. 

Is Emerald Ash Borer the Next Chestnut Blight?

“Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at your nose….” We’re all familiar with this popular holiday song, but have you ever wondered how to roast chestnuts? Or exactly what a chestnut tree looks like? Why don’t we see them growing in our neighborhoods?

Once, American chestnut was a major component of eastern forests from Maine to Michigan and south to Alabama and Mississippi. Called the ‘Redwood of the East’ because of the tremendous size of mature trees, American chestnuts made up approximately 25% of forests in the eastern United States. When chestnuts bloomed in spring, the Appalachian mountains appeared covered in snow. The trees were an important part of the rural economy, as a source of highly rot-resistant lumber, and the nuts a major food source for wildlife. Trainloads of chestnuts were sent to eastern cities to be roasted and sold by street vendors during the holidays. However, today the American chestnut has been reduced to merely an under-story shrub in eastern forests.

More…. Read the entire article on the Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County Horticulture website: Is Emerald Ash Borer the Next Chestnut Blight

 

Pumpkin Pudding – Recipe of the Month

This recipe accompanied an article by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County. It appeared in the November/December 2018 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter


Pumpkin pudding (Photo by Craig Chandler, UNL Communications).

Pumpkin pudding (Photo by Craig Chandler, UNL Communications).

PUMPKIN PUDDING
(6 Servings)

1 package (5.1 ounces) instant vanilla pudding mix, regular or sugar-free
2 cups low-fat milk
1 can (15 ounces) pumpkin puree
1-1/2 cups whipped topping
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

  1. In a medium bowl, mix pudding and milk with
    an electric mixer for 1–2 minutes.
  2. Add pumpkin to pudding mixture. Stir in whipped topping with whisk or spoon. Mix well.
  3. Add cinnamon and mix well.
  4. Chill until served

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 190, Total Fat 3.5 g (6%
DV), Saturated Fat 3 g (14% DV), Cholesterol 5 mg (1% DV),
Sodium 410 mg (17% DV), Total Carbohydrate 38 g (13% DV),
Dietary Fiber 2 g (9% DV), Sugars 34 g, Protein 4 g, Vitamin A
220%, Vitamin C 4%, Calcium 15%, Iron 6%.

Source: Nebraska Nutrition Education Program

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Halloween Fruit Parfaits

This recipe tip accompanied an article written by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County, entitled “Happy, Healthy Halloween”, September 2018 NEBLINE


Halloween Fruit Parfaits

(Photo by Kayla Colgrove, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County)

HALLOWEEN FRUIT PARFAITS
(6 Servings)
Ingredients:

  • 1 can (20 ounces) pineapple tidbits in 100% juice, drained
  • 2 cans (15 ounces) mandarin oranges in water, no sugar added, drained
  • 2 cups nonfat vanilla Greek yogurt
  • 6 pieces candy corn

Directions:

  1. Drain pineapple tidbits and mandarin oranges.
  2. Layer 1/3 cup pineapple tidbits, 1/3 cup mandarin oranges and 1/3 cup yogurt in each of the 6 clear plastic cups 9 ounces).
  3. Keep parfaits in the refrigerator until ready to serve. Garnish with a piece of candy corn right before serving.

Kayla’s Notes:
• Select fruit canned in 100% fruit juice or water rather than syrup when choosing canned fruits.
• Try fresh fruit in place of canned fruit.
• Swap out any yellow and orange fruit you like best such as using peaches or cantaloupe for mandarin oranges.

Nutrition Information per serving (1 parfait) — nutrition information will change if substitutions are used: Calories 157, Total Fat 0g, Saturated Fat 0g, Cholesterol 1.7mg, Sodium 37mg, Total Carbohydrate 31.5g, Dietary Fiber 1.3g, Sugars 24.1g, Protein 7.7g

You’ll find this helpful recipe and more in the September 2018 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter. Available free online.

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

What’s Happening Sunday? It is BIG BOWL GAME DAY!

Sunday, February 4, 2018 is a big day for thousands of football fans across the country. It is the second-largest day for U.S. food consumption, after Thanksgiving Day, according to Wikipedia.

Develop a winning Big Bowl “food game plan” by thinking like a football player on the playing field. Only, instead of the opposing team, your field is filled with food and refreshments. Alice Henneman, MS, RDN, Extension Educator, put together eight winning strategies to help you win the game from getting in condition, sizing up the opponent, advancing to the goal line and finally, to making a TOUCHDOWN! You’ll also find delicious recipes for Pinto Bean Salsa Dip and Tuna Veggie Dip.

Visit https://food.unl.edu/big-bowl-game-plan-healthy-eating for Your Big Bowl Game
Plan for Healthy Eating
tips and recipes.

Making guacamole for the big game? Learn how to keep your guacamole from turning brown!

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Spicy Pumpkin Shake Recipe

This recipe accompanied an article by Alice Henneman, MS, RDN, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County, entitled “Holiday Food Safety Bloopers”, November/December 2017 NEBLINE


Spicy Pumpkin Pie Shake - Alice Henneman, Extension Educator

SPICY PUMPKIN SHAKE
This shake, in combination with a whole grain muffin, could serve as a light meal. Or, enjoy this spicy delight as a delicious treat at the end of a busy, active day. It’s loaded with vitamin A and is a source of calcium — so you’re not drinking “empty calories.”

Use the following ingredients per one serving:

  • 1/4 cup canned pumpkin (NOT canned pumpkin pie MIX)
  • 1/3 cup nonfat milk
  • 1 cup low-fat frozen vanilla yogurt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice

Add all ingredients to a blender. Cover and blend on high until smooth. If desired, garnish with a dash of pumpkin pie spice.

Check out ALICE’S NOTES for ways to use pumpkin pie spice and leftover pumpkin: Continue reading