Sorting Food Facts and Myths…

by Alice Henneman, MS, RDN, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County, “Sorting Food Facts and Myths: Foods Marketed as Being Free of Certain Substances”, February 2017 NEBLINE


Current food trends suggest there is confusion about the safety of the food system (production, processing distribution, consumption and waste management) leading to skepticism and decreased consumer confidence in our food supply.

For example: Foods Marketed as Hormone Free

IMG_0018Did you know? A food may claim to be “free of hormones” — however, it may never have contained hormones. For example, federal law prohibits the use of hormones in poultry production. Today’s birds are larger due to advances in breeding, animal nutrition and animal care. Likewise, federal law prohibits the use of hormones in pig production. The amount of lean meat produced per pig has increased due to animal selection and nutrition. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, “Hormones are not allowed in raising hogs or poultry. Therefore, the claim ‘no hormones added’ cannot be used on the labels of pork or poultry unless it is followed by a statement that says ‘Federal regulations prohibit the use of hormones.’” Be aware, the claim may be in much larger letters than the statement saying the use of hormones is prohibited.

Read the entire article and find a recipe for “Berry Good Pancakes” in the February issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter. Available free online.

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

It’s Cold Out There!

Many of us are waking up this morning to ice, snow and dangerous wind chills. Taking preventative steps is your best defense when dealing with extreme cold weather. Prepare your home and vehicles in advance of weather emergencies. Keep abreast of changing weather and road conditions. Practice safety during these times of bitter cold and you’ll reduce your risk for weather-related health problems or injury.

If you absolutely have to venture outdoors, make sure you are dressed for extreme cold weather conditions.

How to dress in the cold

Learn to recognize the symptoms of hypothermia and frostbite. Hypothermia is a more serious medical condition and requires immediate emergency medical assistance. Check on neighbors, family and friends who may be susceptible to the cold. Learn more: Continue reading

Happy Thanksgiving From Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County!

“For the golden corn
and the apples on the tree,
For the golden butter
and honey for our tea;
For fruits and nuts and
berries, that grow
beside the way
For birds and bees and
flowers, we give thanks
every day”
–author unknown

Happy Thanksgiving to you and your family from all of us here at Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County! Today, we recycled the fall decorations from our office by placing them into the Cherry Creek Pollinator Habitat. It will be fun to watch the wildlife on the live camera as they check out the pumpkins, squash […]

via Happy Thanksgiving! — The Buzz at Cherry Creek

7 Super Things Parents & Caregivers Can Do

Love your children1. Talk often with your children from the day they are born.

2. Hug them, hold them and respond to their needs and interests.

3. Listen carefully as your children communicate with you.

4. Read aloud to your children every day, even when they are babies. Play and sing with them often.

5. Say “yes” and “I love you” as much as you say “no” and “don’t.”

6. Ensure a safe, orderly and predictable environment, wherever they are.

7. Set limits on their behavior and discipline them calmly, not harshly.

Source: The NEBLINE Newsletter (Nov/Dec14 issue) Early Development Network Babies Can’t Wait 

Here’s to keeping families first … until next time,

Soni Cochran

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere – http://lancaster.unl.edu

If you live outside of Lancaster County, Nebraska, be sure to check out the university extension resources in your community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml

16 Tips For Cutting Family Food Expenses

I am always looking for ways to save money! One of my goals is reduce food waste. Anything that looks close to expiring, I use. I freeze fresh produce if I think it it might expire. Did you know you can freeze tomatoes with the skins on? I’ve used this technique many times and those tomatoes are delicious in stews, chili and soups – especially in winter! (Directions: http://food.unl.edu/freezing-raw-tomatoes-or-without-their-skins)

Enjoy this blog post from the Nebraska Extension Learning Child Team and share your money-saving tips!

Have a great day! Soni

The Learning Child Blog

Cutting food expensesDoes your lettuce turn to mush? Mushrooms start to grow fuzzy? Do your bananas blacken before your family can eat them? In the US, the average family of four, loses $1,500 each year to food it has to throw out. This is like tossing one bag out of every four purchased at the grocery store.

Food is a necessary expense but there are ways to save money. Check out these tips!

1. Use a Grocery List

Keep a grocery list where it’s easily accessible, such as on Use a grocery listthe fridge, and take it with you to the grocery store. Always shop with a list. Stick to your list for added savings, but do stay flexible if you encounter a sale. Gas for an extra trip to the store easily can add a dollar or more to your grocery bill. And the less you shop, the less likely you’ll buy something on impulse.

Examples:

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Grilling Fruits and Vegetables

I love using my grill especially in the fall! Enjoy these tips on grilling fruits and vegetables from the Nebraska Extension Cook it Quick blog!

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Cook It Quick!

Want to get your family to eat more fruits and vegetables? Try grilling them!

The heat from the grill caramelizes the natural sugars in fruits and vegetables, giving them a tasty and sweeter flavor.

I had the opportunity to visit with a representative from Weber grills who is coming to my hometown — Lincoln, Nebraska — to show their new Husker-themed grills at the Nebraska-Oregon football game. Their Chef and Grill Specialist Tyler Selhorst will be on hand to talk about grilling and tailgating tips.

Grilled meat is the first food that usually comes to mind for tailgating and grilling. To round out the meal with more foods from the grill, I asked Weber for some tips for grilling fruits and vegetables.

Grilling Fruit

grilling fruit Grilling fruit (Image courtesy of Weber grills)

Here are some general tips for grilling fruits from Weber.

  1. First preheat your grill for 10-15 minutes and then brush…

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Be Nice, Don’t Give Me Head Lice

Mention the word head lice and you will hear the parents in the room groan. Talk a little longer and someone is bound to start scratching their head. I seem to have that effect on people. The feeling that overcomes an individual who has had experienced head lice is usually one of stress and frustration. Battling these blood-sucking insects can be laborious, time-consuming and at times, a never-ending nightmare. Summer has come to an end and a new school year has begun. Bring on the teachers, pencils, friendships, books and…head lice?

Female head louse

Female human head louse, Pediculus humanus capitis. (Photo: Gilles San Martin)

Why do the incidences of head lice correlate with the return to school?

Believe it or not, head lice are rarely transmitted in schools. Although cases spike after extended periods away from school such as summer vacation, they are most often transmitted among close friends, cousins, siblings and other relatives during events such as sleepovers, camps, and extended visits. The discovery occurs when children return to school, but seldom does it get spread on school property*.

*Transmission activities that may occur that can be the source of transmission in childcare, preschool and elementary school.

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