Sticky situation: Using glue boards to monitor pests

by Jody Green, Extension Educator

IMM stuck to Pheromone traps

Pheromone traps use a natural chemical compounds from female moths to attract males to a sticky glueboard. Photo by Jody Green, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County.

Now that it is winter, some may think the critters that bugged us through the spring, summer and fall are gone due to the cold weather. Unfortunately for homeowners and apartment residents, many insects and other arthropods remain quite active indoors during this time, where they become unwelcomed house pests.

Protecting your home

There are simple, non-toxic and cost-effective tools that can be purchased to monitor the presence of pests in your home. If something is caught, it should be identified to determine whether it is of concern and whether control measures are required. It is important to understand that while these monitors may catch pests in your home, they may not be enough to control or eliminate them completely.

Trapping

Sticky traps, glue traps or glue boards are inexpensive, disposable, non-toxic cardboard or plastic trays with special glue on one side to capture pests. These can be purchased at local hardware and grocery stores and may be labeled for insects, spiders and/or rodents, but a variety of crawling pests are likely to get caught on these traps if pests are present.

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Parenting information when you need it

Reading to young childrenAre you expecting your first child? Do you have children or grandchildren? Finding reliable parenting information and advice on the web can be overwhelming! How do you know what you can trust? Just in Time Parenting e-newsletters from our eXtension partners are reliable and relevant resources – and they are free!

Just in Time Parenting Newsletters include:

  • Easy to use guides on how your child is developing
  • Tips on raising a healthy, happy child
  • Tools for solving common parenting problems
  • Strategies for coping with the challenges of raising children

Why should parents choose Just in Time Parenting?

  • Timely automatic delivery directly to your inbox
  • Available in English and Spanish
  • Access to full-color PDFs for printing and sharing
  • Links to podcasts, videos, and other resources
  • Commercial free — no toy or product ads
  • Based on research and written by experts who are parents themselves!

Visit Just in Time Parenting – https://jitp.info/

Here’s to a terrific 2019!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

NEBLINE Newsletter. Available free online.

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Put Your Christmas Tree to Good Use

by Sarah Browning, Extension Educator – Horticulture

Add fruit garland to your Christmas Tree

Add fruit garland to your Christmas Tree

Before taking your Christmas tree to the recycling center this year, consider using it to create backyard habitat for birds. To attract birds to your backyard, you must provide their three basic needs- food, water, and cover or shelter. Your old Christmas tree will provide excellent shelter for birds, providing protection from wind and predators. It can also serve as a feeding station, where you provide a buffet of food that our native birds love.

Before taking the tree outside, remove all decorations and lights, including tinsel. To provide the most shelter possible for the birds, place the tree on the south or east side of the house, sheltered from winter’s harsh north and west winds. Anchor the tree securely by setting the stump into the ground or a large bucket of damp sand, and securing the top of the tree with twine to nearby building, fence or trees.

There are several more ways to recycle your Christmas tree. Learn more, read the entire article “Recycling Ideas – Christmas Trees“.

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Chicken Noodle Soup – Recipe of the Month

This recipe accompanied an article by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County. It appears in the January 2019 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter


Chicken Noodle Soup

(Photo by Craig Chandler, UNL Communications)

January is national soup month. Try this recipe from Nebraska Extension’s Nutrition Education Program (nep.unl.edu) which includes whole wheat egg noodles. It is easily adaptable to beef noodle or chicken and rice soup.

CHICKEN NOODLE SOUP
(6 Servings)

1 whole chicken*
1 teaspoon salt
Water, to cover
1 onion, chopped
3 large carrots, sliced
1 cup celery, sliced
3/4 cup whole wheat egg noodles, uncooked**

  1. In a large saucepan, place chicken and salt. Add enough water so the chicken is covered. Heat to boiling. Cover, reduce heat and simmer about 45 minutes or until chicken is tender.
  2. Remove chicken from broth and cool enough to handle. Remove skin and bones and chop the meat. Skim fat from broth.
  3. Add additional water, if needed, to make 6 cups. Bring to a boil.
  4. Add chicken, onion, carrots, celery and noodles to the broth. Cover, reduce heat and simmer for 20 minutes.

*Substitute 2 pounds roast or stew meat for chicken to make Beef Noodle Soup.
**Substitute 3/4 cup rice for noodles to make Chicken and Rice Soup.

Nutrition Facts Per Serving: Calories 180, Total Fat 3.5 g (5% DV), 1 g Saturated Fat (5% DV), 80 mg Cholesterol (27% DV), 520 mg Sodium (22% DV), 11 g Total Carbohydrate (4% DV), 2 g Dietary Fiber (8% DV), 3 g Sugars, 25 g Protein, Vitamin A 100%, Vitamin C 15 %, Calcium 4%, Iron 8%.

Source: Nebraska Nutrition Education Program

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –

Roasting chestnuts … and what has happened to American Chestnut trees?

American Chestnuts. Photo by Pixabay

American Chestnuts. Photo by Pixabay

So how do you roast chestnuts?

With a sharp knife, make an incision through the smooth outer skin and textured inner skin on the rounded side of each nut. This allows steam to escape and prevents the nuts from bursting during roasting. Roast the nuts over an open fire in a wire popcorn basket or special chestnut roasting pan, shaking periodically, for 15-20 minutes. Allow the nuts to cool slightly before peeling and eating. Chestnuts can also be roasted in the oven after scoring, at 375 ° degrees for 15-25 minutes. Place them in a shallow pan, and turn them over mid-way through the roasting time.

The information on roasting chestnuts was included in the following article written by Sarah Browning, Extension Educator. 

Is Emerald Ash Borer the Next Chestnut Blight?

“Chestnuts roasting on an open fire, Jack Frost nipping at your nose….” We’re all familiar with this popular holiday song, but have you ever wondered how to roast chestnuts? Or exactly what a chestnut tree looks like? Why don’t we see them growing in our neighborhoods?

Once, American chestnut was a major component of eastern forests from Maine to Michigan and south to Alabama and Mississippi. Called the ‘Redwood of the East’ because of the tremendous size of mature trees, American chestnuts made up approximately 25% of forests in the eastern United States. When chestnuts bloomed in spring, the Appalachian mountains appeared covered in snow. The trees were an important part of the rural economy, as a source of highly rot-resistant lumber, and the nuts a major food source for wildlife. Trainloads of chestnuts were sent to eastern cities to be roasted and sold by street vendors during the holidays. However, today the American chestnut has been reduced to merely an under-story shrub in eastern forests.

More…. Read the entire article on the Nebraska Extension in Lancaster County Horticulture website: Is Emerald Ash Borer the Next Chestnut Blight

 

Staying connected with family during the holidays — and all year round

by Katie Krause, Extension Educator, November/December 2018 NEBLINE

Grandpa and Granddaughter working on a laptop

Stay connected over the holidays

The holidays are often times when family and friends gather together, sometimes traveling by car or plane. But how can you connect young children with family and friends this holiday season (and all year round!)?

BREAKING BARRIERS TO CONNECTION
When I moved to Nebraska a few years ago, I knew the hardest thing for me would be being so far away from my family. I have such fond memories of both sides of my family coming together for holidays; grandparents, great-grand parents, aunts, uncles and cousins. While we are able to visit with family in person a couple of times a year, being all together is just not possible for every holiday. Thankfully, there are still a lot of ways I can help my son, Weston, build a relationship with family members 800 miles away!

The traditional method of communicating over the phone is still a common way to keep in touch; however, children as old as nine can have difficulty understanding and processing phone conversations. This doesn’t mean do not try to have phone conversations, just be aware that they may not be as meaningful for a young child as they are for the adults. Also, keeping a child’s attention on a voice coming out of a tiny device isn’t usually too captivating, so plan on a hello, maybe a short conversation and probably a quick goodbye from your little one.

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Finding time for fitness over the holidays

by Kayla Colgrove, MS, RDN, ACSM-CPT, Extension Educator, November/December 2018 NEBLINE


Fitness Photo

Finding time for fitness (photo by Pixabay)

The holiday season is here. Trying to balance holiday parties, shopping, baking, cleaning, entertaining and work may lead to some stressful times. What about eating healthy or physical activity? Finding time for fitness over the holidays may be hard because of the cooler weather and busy schedules.

Including physical activity during the holiday season can help you prevent weight gain and release stress. Here are three tips to help you fit in fitness over the holiday season.

TIP #1: SCHEDULE ACTIVITY INTO YOUR DAILY ROUTINE

Schedule your physical activity in advance by putting it on your calendar and treat it like an important appointment. Incorporate physical activity you enjoy doing at the most convenient time to accomplish your fitness goals during the busy holiday season.

The Physical Activity Guidelines for Americans issued by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommend adults aim for at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity each week. Set a goal for 30 minutes of physical activity on most days. Do not worry about getting all 30 minutes of exercise done at one time. As long as the aerobic activity is performed at a moderate effort for at least 10 minutes at a time, it still counts towards your 30 minutes.

TIP #2: INCORPORATE EASY ACTIVITIES TO GET MOVING DURING THE HOLIDAYS

Including these activities will help achieve your physical activity goals:

  • Park at the far end of the parking lot.
  • Take extra laps around the store before checking out.
  • Use the stairs instead of escalators.
  • Include mall walking to enjoy the decorations while window shopping.
  • Dance to your favorite holiday music.
  • Work out at home to an exercise DVD.

TIP #3: CREATE HEALTHY HOLIDAY TRADITIONS

Adding seasonal activities to your holidays can be fun and also create healthier holiday traditions. Walk around your neighborhood instead of riding in your car to look at holiday lights and decorations. Incorporate winter activities such as sledding, ice skating, snow skiing, or taking a winter nature hike. After a holiday dinner, organize a walk, basketball or football game to catch up with family members while incorporating fun physical activities.

Reference: Clemson Cooperative Extension. (December, 2010). Let the Holiday Spirit Move You! Retrieved from http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/nutrition/nutrition/dietary_guide/hgic4034.html

You’ll find this helpful tip and more in the November/December 2018 issue of the NEBLINE Newsletter. Available free online.

If you don’t live in Lancaster County, Nebraska, please make sure to check out your local extension office too. Your extension office has resources for you, your family and community. To find your local office, visit http://lancaster.unl.edu/office/locate.shtml (nationwide listing).

Have a great day!!

Soni

Responsive. Innovative. Trusted.
Nebraska Extension provides research-based information to help you make informed decisions any time, any place, anywhere –